Tag Archives: haiku

Graphical abstracts are so passé, let’s hear it for the haiku highlight

Graphical abstracts,

They’re past their sell by date;

Use Haikus instead

 

It may surprise you, or perhaps not, that insects, as well as inspiring poets to wax lyrical, inspire many entomologists to wax poetical 🙂  Indeed, I have, on occasion, penned the odd verse myself.

Available at a very reasonable price from Pemberley Books  and no, I have no vested interests 🙂

Back in 2016 I stepped down as Editor-in-Chief of Insect Conservation & Diversity to become a Senior Editor, handing over the reins to Raphael Didham who had been a Senior Editor since 2010.  Now, I have known Raph a long time, back in the 1990s we were colleagues at Silwood Park, but it wasn’t until I convinced him to join Twitter as @EntoRaph, at the Royal Entomological Society Publications Meeting in March this year, that I discovered his dark secret.  He is a poet as well as an entomologist!  Raph is, despite his late conversion to Twitter, a pretty innovative guy; just look at the excellent changes he has made to our journal, and once he discovered, via Twitter, that I too, indulge in the odd spot of verse, haikus to be precise, it was inevitable that the idea of the Haiku Highlight was born 🙂

The birth of a notion

And that dear Reader, is how it all began………


I was quite proud of this one 🙂

The eagle-eyed reader may have noticed that the hashtag for our Haiku Highlights is #sciku. The Sciku project  is the brainwave of zoologist Andrew Holmes @AndrewMHolmes, who argues that writing haiku has made him a better scientist.  Being asked to keep your writing short and sweet, yet still understandable, may sometimes be difficult, but as Judy Fort Brenneman points out, it can be great fun.

If you would like to contribute to our Haiku Highlight project do get in touch. I wonder if it will catch on with other journals, it would certainly be fun.  While I am on the subject of entomologist poets, if you like butterflies and poetry, I can thoroughly recommend The Butterfly Collection, by Richard Harrington; beautiful photographs and a range of verse from haiku to sonnet.

 

Published by Brambleby Books http://www.bramblebybooks.co.uk/butterfly_collection.asp

 

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The Natural World in Haiku Form – Volume 2

Nature versified.

Haikus from the year gone by

To enjoy or not.

 

Cryptic and not

Grasshoppers blend in;

 Busy ants don’t care at all

 If you see them there

17th August 2018 Vinca

 

Ants

Mountainous thunder

Sends ants scuttling to their nest.

Seeds await the wind

 

Ants again – Reverse Haiku

Ants, sensing distant thunder,

Scuttle to their nest,

While seeds pods wait for the wind.

22nd May 2018 Vinca

 

Aphids

 

Aphids are so cool.

Three generations, making

One clonal body

25 December 2017

 

Raucous Rooks

Starkly black on blue.

Rudely cawing rooks disturb

My morning coffee

15 February 2018

 

Raucous rooks railing.

Sable, swooping, skyward sailing,

Disturb my morning

26th February 2018

 

Mountain

Sunny Canigou,

Snowy peak shining brightly.

Winter in Vinca

20th January 2018

 

Malham Tarn

Rising from the rain

Summer mist, slowly rolling,

Hides Malham Tarn

July 16th 2018

 

Prunella

Commonly overlooked,

 Elastically plastic;

Purple Prunella

July 17th 2018

 

Four Brothers?

Four trees in a row
Standing smallest to tallest.
What is their story?

August  20th 2018, Vinca

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Working from home in France

My wife and I are lucky enough to own a second home in France, in the Pays D’Oc. Hopefully, when we fully retire, it will be our main, if not only home.  At the moment, I get to spend much less time there than I would like, but since I semi-retired this academic year, the frequency of my visits has increased.

I have just finished a two-week spell there, not on holiday, but working from home, five days of which were spent working on a field skills handbook with two former colleagues of mine from Imperial College who used to help me run our two-week long final year Biodiversity & Conservation Field Course.  We have been working on this book for more than six years but to say that progress had been snail-like would be an exaggeration, glacial would be a better description.

Being away from our respective campuses, and the day-to-day academic trivia, meant that we were able to concentrate fully on the task at hand. We made incredible progress, and that was despite being connected to the internet and having access to Skype and email.  We now, in just five days and with very relaxed lunch-times, have a pretty good skeleton to show our prospective publisher.   A proper retreat works wonders; I can thoroughly recommend it.  It would be great if I could persuade my Head of Department to fund an official retreat for me and some of my colleagues to get together to write papers and grant proposals. It would definitely repay itself in increased grant income 🙂

The authors, looking relaxed but thinking hard.

The location certainly helps, with an office window view like this, who can help but be inspired 😊

The view from my office

 

In fact, I was so inspired I turned to verse.

 

Mountainous thunder

Sends ants scuttling to their nest.

Seeds await the wind

#haiku

 

Ants, sensing distant thunder,

Scuttle to their nest,

While seeds pods wait for the wind

#reversehaiku

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