Tag Archives: PhD vivas

Time of year determines some, but not all, views of my blog posts

I was going to format this post as a spoof Nature communication, but not being as skilled as our students, who turn out excellently formatted mock papers for their assignments, decided not to. I did, however, go for a typical Nature title 🙂

The other day when I was looking at my blog stats I clicked on the view post stats button next to my most read post of the day, Not all aphids are vegans*, and was amused enough by the strong seasonal dynamics shown to post it on Twitter.

Not all aphids are vegans – strong seasonal dynamics

As you can see, the peaks and troughs of views strongly follow the times of year that aphids are present and absent.

As regular readers of my blog will know, I am a bit of an aphidophile. It is kind of hard to miss if I’m honest, but then aphids are fantastic and awesome, so you will get no apologies from me for loving them and writing, or talking about them whenever I get the chance to do so.

That said, not all my posts are about aphids, insects yes, but I do write about other things too, including entomological equipment, classic papers and teaching matters, and sometimes about my holidays 🙂

Given the strong correlation between aphid life cycle timing and visits to the post about biting aphids, I wondered how my other aphid posts stacked up in terms of seasonal viewing.

Aphid life cycles – bizarre, complex or what?

Somewhat surprisingly, well to me at least, the post about aphid life cycles did not show very strong seasonal dynamics, although April, when aphids start to become active, did, at the beginning of the post’s life, show a bit of a peak of interest, but has since broken down completely.  Another season aspect of aphid biology is wing formation. This is usually associated with late spring and early summer (Dixon, 1973, 1976), and in this case, the viewing history fitted appropriately.

Not all aphids have wings – seasonally appropriate

 

What about the other end of the year, autumn and winter?  As expected, my post about aphid overwintering showed the reverse pattern to the other aphid posts, people wanted to read about aphid overwintering as winter appraoched.

A Winter’s Tale – aphid overwintering

Aphid posts, as predicted, show a correlation (OK, not tested) with the time of year associated with the appropriate part of the life cycle.  We would therefore expect that posts that are more general would show no marked seasonality in their popularity. To test this I looked at first, my posts that deal with entomological equipment, pan traps, clip cages and the poster and then at two posts that fit into the teaching category.  Staring with the Pan trap, a very basic and commonly used piece of field equipment, despite a slight expectation on my part that there might be a spring peak (after all, that is when insects start flying) there was no pattern that I could see.

The pan trap – disappointingly no pattern

 

Nest I looked at the Pooter, an essential bit of general entomological kit (Leather, 2015) used by entomologists of all types. Given that this is used in both the laboratory and the field, I didn’t really expect to see any pattern jumping out at me.  I wasn’t disappointed although if you look very quickly, and not too closely, it is just about possible top convince yourself that there is an increase in views during the summer, which would fit with the general increase in insects caught in nets.

The Pooter – perhaps a slight tendency for views to increase in mid-summer

 

Next, back to aphids, this time a piece of kit that is almost, but not entirely, confined to aphidologists (Macgillivray & Anderson, 1957).  My expectation here, was that given that clip cages are almost always used in laboratories or glasshouses, that there would be absolutely no pattern in the viewing figures. Sure enough, that was the outcome.

The clip cage – no discernible patterns

Finally, the two teaching posts, first my tribute to Southwood’s classic species-area paper (Southwood, 1961).  I know that this post is used for undergraduate teaching at one university, so given the regularity of university timetabling, might have a chance of  showing a pattern;  It didn’t.

Southwood (1961) – the number of insect species associated with various trees – no pattern

Finally, a post that has attracted a modicum of attention over the years, all about what to expect in a PhD viva.  My hypothesis for this, given that most PhD projects start at the beginning of the academic year and run for four or five years before submission, was that if there was going to be an annual peak in views that it would be between October and January.  To save you the troubkle of squinting at the graph, there was no pattern.

Are PhD examiners really ogres? – no consistent peak

In conclusion, aphid posts tend to show viewing patterns consistent with the time of year and life cycle stage, other, more general posts show absolutely no pattern.

 

References

Dixon, A.F.G. (1973) Biology of Aphids. Edward Arnold, London.

Dixon, A.F.G. (1976) Reproductive strategies of the alate morphs of the bird cherry-oat aphid Rhopalosiphum padi. Journal of Animal Ecology, 45, 817-830.

Leather, S.R. (2015) An entomological classic – the Pooter or insect aspirator. British Journal of Entomology & Natural History, 28, 52-54.

MacGillivray, M.E. & Anderson, G.B. (1957) Three useful insect cages. Canadian Entomologist, 89, 43-46.

Southwood, T.R.E. (1961) The number of species of insect associated with various trees. Journal of Animal Ecology, 30, 1-8.

 

 

 

 

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Social media and academia do work well together – two years in and still a fan

It is now just over two years since I began tweeting and just under two years since I started blogging. My first end of year report saw me entering my second year as a fully converted Tweeter and Blogger and very happy indeed with my foray into the world of social media.  I had made new research contacts, got invitations to give talks to local conservation groups, got BBC Wildlife to acknowledge their vertebrate bias,

BBC Wildlife

been invited to give a talk on the subject at the Royal Entomological Society annual meeting and even got a publication in the journal Animal Conservation!  So I definitely finished 2013 on a high and began the New Year with an almost evangelical desire to convince all my colleagues to join in the fun.

So now here I am, two years in. Is it still working for me?  Most definitely.  I have amassed over 2300 followers on Twitter and 124 people are signed up to receive updates to my blog.  I have, including this article, written 65 blog posts.  Views on my blog have increased from a daily average of 39 to 67 and at the time of writing it has received over 22000 views compared with just over 14000 last year.  I figure that this is considerably more exposure than I get from my published scientific papers.  That said, I have as a direct result of my blogging activities had two more papers published (Leather, 2014, 2015) and been asked to submit a more formal version of my end of year report to Antenna (the house journal of the Royal Entomological Society) which will give me a chance to sway a somewhat larger entomological audience than I had at the annual meeting last September (2013)! My good-natured jibes (via Twitter) at the Journal of Animal Ecology accusing them of a vertebrate bias, resulted in me being asked to edit one of their Virtual Issues which in turn, resulted in a very interesting post on their blog by their Editor-in-Chief Ken Wilson.

As a journal editor, I have been able to find referees for papers and also new editorial board members. I have also found Twitter an invaluable way of advertising the MSc course in Entomology that I run here at Harper Adams University,  of advertising PhD and staff positions and of generally reaching and interacting with a huge number of like-minded people around the world.   It is of course not all one way traffic, I get a number of requests for help and information that I am, if able, happy to respond positively to.

My biggest buzz this year was to receive a complimentary copy of a book by Peter Smith (Smith, 2014), in which one of my blog posts,

Smith book

Are PhD Examiners really ogres? was quoted several times.   I have to confess that this gave me pretty much the same feeling that I got when I saw my first ever paper (Leather, 1980) in print 😉

So to answer the question I posed at the start of this post. Yes, I am still as firmly, if not more so, convinced as I was a year ago, that social media is an essential part of a rounded academic life.  Of course if you are reading this I am probably preaching to the converted 😉

References

Leather, S.R. (1980) Egg survival in the bird cherry-oat aphid, Rhopalosiphum padi. Entomologia experimentalis et applicata, 27, 96-97.

Leather, S.R. (2013) Institutional vertebratism hampers insect conservation generally; not just saproxylic beetle conservation. Animal Conservation, 16, 379-380.

Leather, S.R. (2014) How Stephen Jay Gould wrote Macbeth – not giving credit where its due: lazy referencing and ignoring precedence. Ideas in Ecology & Evolution, 7, 30-40.

Leather, S.R. (2015) An entomological classic: the Pooter or insect aspirator. British Journal of Entomology and Natural History, 28, in press

Smith, P. (2014) The PhD Viva: How to Prepare for your Oral Examination.  Palgrave Macmillan, Basingstoke

 

 

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