Tag Archives: rewilding

Pick & Mix 65 – beetle based drones, biodiversity, climate change, resilient forests, beavers and rewilding, citizen science and a farewell to Dynamic Ecology blog

A drone with wings inspired by beetle elytra

Interesting take – The case against the concept of biodiversity

Why eye-catching graphics are vital for getting to grips with climate change

Graeme Lyons argues that English names of species should always be capitalised – I agree, do you?

Fantastic project – croplands up close – should be very useful for many fields (pun intended)

How ornithologists figured out how to preserve bird specimens

Is your forest fit for the future? Emily Fensom from the UK Forestry Commission introduces the Climate Matching Tool and suggests how this can be used to build resilient forests

Beavers are back: here’s what this might mean for the UK’s wild spaces

What is and what isn’t citizen science?  I don’t fully agree with some of this but it is an interesting read.

In which the team from Dynamic Ecology announce their semi-retirement.  They will still be keeping us inspired, entertained and stimulated but just not as often. I will miss them and judging by the huge number of comments, I am not the only one. Some fantastic and very well-deserved tributes.

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Pick & Mix 64 – big questions in ecology, entomological colonialism, the return of the Nature Table, ID apps, saving insects, rewilding, making your garden insect friendly and how big?!!

Charley Krebs on what are the big questions in ecology and how we might go about addressing them –  Whither the Big Questions in Ecology?

Colonialism in entomology – a historical problem that still persists today

Totally agree – Nature Tables should make a return to the classroom as in my opinion, should the weekly Nature walk. Even in an urban environment there are plenty of opportunities to introduce children to the natural world.

Why planting tons of trees isn’t enough to solve climate change – Massive projects need much more planning and follow-through to succeed – and other tree protections need to happen too

A warning note that iNaturalist and other ID apps are not perfect – sometimes they can be dangerous, but thankfully, not often

Scary stuff, a long read, but worth it “The older the article, the less likely it is that the links work. If you go back to 1998, 72 percent of the links are dead. Overall, more than half of all articles in The New York Times that contain deep links have at least one rotted link.”

Why I hate pandas and other entomologists hate koalas! Forget charisma, save our insects! Never underestimate the politics swirling around charismatic megafauna

A rewilding experiment set up before the term existed – Monks Wood Wilderness

Life lessons from beekeepers – stop mowing the lawn, don’t pave the driveway and get used to bugs in your salad

A bit of fun – visual comparisons of extinct megafauna and their living relatives – some really startling size differences

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Pick & Mix 57 – insect decline, rewilding death, blister beetles, chicken nuggets, fraudulent honey and much more

How we can help reverse insect decline

Nature emerging from the industrial wastelands

Why keeping one mature street tree is far better for humans and nature than planting lots of new ones

Blister and oil beetles

Chicken nuggets grown in a lab have just been approved for sale for the first time in the world! So what is lab-grown meat and is it even worth it?  Watch the video here

Biodiversity: why foods grown in warm climates could be doing the most damage to wildlife

Honey fraud – a bigger problem than you might think

Royal Jelly Isn’t What Makes a Queen Bee a Queen Bee -Everything we thought we knew about royal jelly is backward.

Charley Krebs – On an Experimental Design Mafia for Ecology

Rewilding death – not as macabre as you might think

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Pick & Mix 56 – gardens, forests, bogons, rewilding, ovicidal plants, David Attenborough, bucatini and faeces using bees

How to nurture Nature in your garden this winter

Conference in the time of corona: a beginner’s guide to hybrid conferencing

Liam Heneghan asks Can we restore Nature?

Why not visit and old growth forest in North America with Anurag Agrawal?

Where have all the bogons gone?

Some plants kill insect herbivores before they hatch

Why David Attenborough cannot be replaced

Was Thomas Cromwell the first rewilder?

Did you know that there us a species of bee that uses animal faeces to defend their colonies?

Are you a fan of bucatini? The great USA bucatini shortage of 2020

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Pick & Mix 55 – carbon footprints, magic mushrooms, ecological fiction, royal rewilding, fluffy pterosaurs, invasive toads and much more

Offsetting your carbon footprint is not as simple as some think

The mystery of feather origins: how fluffy pterosaurs have reignited debate

Science isn’t broken –  It’s just a hell of a lot harder than we give it credit for.

The diet of invasive toads in Mauritius has some rare species on the menu

Liberty cap: the surprising tale of how Europe’s magic mushroom got its name

Did you know that horseshoe crabs are used to test vaccines?

Some great ecological fiction, from Barbara Kingsolver to the Moomins

Should the Queen rewild Balmoral?

Wonderful moths

The more species of bird you see the happier you feel – link to actual paper here

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Pick & Mix 38 – a very mixed bag

The problem with ‘Sugar Daddy’ science, why state funding is better

Simon Leadbeater on rewilding a planation woodland

Did you know that Scotland has rain forests?

Some advice on writing papers from novelist Cormac McCarthy

Making cities greener – what we can do and what benefits result

If you like the Moomins you will appreciate this

Clothing accessories that pay homage to the insect world; some other animals too 😊

Freedom of press and environmental protection – did you know that they are linked? Jeff Ollerton and colleagues explore this interesting topic

Working from home might not be as stress-free as you think – go to work instead

Did you know that there are more male specimens of birds and mammals in museum collections than females? Press release here, actual paper here

 

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Pick and Mix 29 – More stuff that caught my eye

What happens when you microwave two grapes and why

What happens if all the insects disappear?

Artists illustrating the digital collection at  The Natural History Museum London

Erica McAlister writes about the wonderful Dark-Edged Bee Fly

More from Erica on the wonders of flies

Growing carrots in bottles

Spanish salt pans, conservation and bird migrations

Interactions between fire and butterflies – how prescribed burning helps rare species

Successful eradication of an invasive species

This might upset a few people – is the term rewilding just a trendy buzzword for restoration?

 

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Pick and mix 4 – more links to ponder

I found these interesting, perhaps some of you will?

 

Interesting post on urban re-wilding

From a couple of years ago, but if you ever wondered how Drosophila became a model organism then read this

How the noise natural gas extraction machines make can affect insect abundance

A nice easy to read post to help make non-entomologists realise the importance of insects and how abundant they are

The Backwinter – A lyrical account of a cold snap in London and its effect on insect and plant emergence by Emma Maund

A timely reminder that there is a lot of genetic material in the wild that can help our domesticated crops taste better

If you wondered what they really ate in the middle ages wonder no longer

An interesting read about an early collector of curiosities Ole Worm’s Cabinet of Wonder: Natural Specimens and Wondrous Monsters

If you are a fan of spring flowers this post from Alice Hunter is a must read/see

Ray Cannon on the tale of a tail 🙂

 

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