Category Archives: Pick and mix

Pick and mix 5 – more links to ponder

Another set of links that interested me enough to read (and this week, watch) them all the way through.

 

Interesting (tongue-in-cheek) post about using Ribwort plantain as a garden flower

Jo Cartmell (@watervole) on how to turn your boring lawn into a beautiful wildflower meadow

Gretchen Vögel asks – Where have all the insects gone?

How ploughing and deep tillage methods are harming earthworms worldwide

We have been telling our students for years that one of the advantages of biological control compared with conventional use of pesticides is that prey are unlikely to evolve resistance to natural enemies.  Well, we were wrong – here is a story about a pest weevil that has done just that  – unfortunately behind a pay wall

Insects and ethics – Some very interesting points, but as much as I love insects which I do passionately, I am very happy, that ethically speaking, they are not classified as animals. Research would be impossible. That said, all insects in my garden live a free and happy life and are never knowingly killed, not even if they are on my bean plants 🙂

A nice article about photographing spiders and also mentions ethics

Here Markus Eichhorn writes about the questionable ethical standpoints of some otherwise reputable scientists from the last century

An interactive blog post about global crop diversity and eating habits – quite revealing, try it and see

An interesting and well produced short video that could be useful if you want to explain how sustainable management of tropical forests helps the planet and why you should only buy FSC certified products

 

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Pick and mix 4 – more links to ponder

I found these interesting, perhaps some of you will?

 

Interesting post on urban re-wilding

From a couple of years ago, but if you ever wondered how Drosophila became a model organism then read this

How the noise natural gas extraction machines make can affect insect abundance

A nice easy to read post to help make non-entomologists realise the importance of insects and how abundant they are

The Backwinter – A lyrical account of a cold snap in London and its effect on insect and plant emergence by Emma Maund

A timely reminder that there is a lot of genetic material in the wild that can help our domesticated crops taste better

If you wondered what they really ate in the middle ages wonder no longer

An interesting read about an early collector of curiosities Ole Worm’s Cabinet of Wonder: Natural Specimens and Wondrous Monsters

If you are a fan of spring flowers this post from Alice Hunter is a must read/see

Ray Cannon on the tale of a tail 🙂

 

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Pick and mix 3 – another set of eclectic links

Another ten links to stuff I found intersting reading

After last week’s many Marches for Science, Timothy Caulfield on why we need “agenda free science

Check out these great images from Dynamic Ecology also celebrating March for Science

Did you know that some beekeepers not only name their Queens but keep a ‘family tree’; also some great photos

Some musings on what you can see if you stand still long enough from Loose and Leafy

An excellent summary from Terry McGlynn on writing good peer reviews

Interesting study from the USA showing that although fungicide residues made up more than 90% of the pesticides found in pollen insecticides posed the most risk

An interesting review paper on how the scent of predators is interpreted by their potential prey, sometimes fatally.  Warning for entomologists, many vertebrate examples given 🙂

For those interested in forest and woodland ecology – here is how to make a middle-aged wood into an ancient one

Amy Hahs on how to bring biodiversity back into cities

As someone who has had some papers rejected multiple times this joint post by Stephen Heard and Andrew Hendry on why multiple rejections are not a sign of poor quality made heartening reading

 

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Pick and mix 2 – more eclectic links

Ten more links to peruse or not.

Not just British hedgehogs, but French hedgehogs are also on the decline

If you are a lover of Wisteria then this is definitely for you

A very thoughtful piece from Terry McGlynn on the ethical and moral stances that scientists take

Here is a report of a workshop run by an ex-PhD student of mine to discuss the future of farming insects for food in the UK

A really interesting paper describing how competition between two parasitic wasps can be influenced by the presence of an endosymbiont

Here is a paper of great relevance to farmers and policy makers but as usual has been published in a high impact journal that farmers and agronomists won’t read; as scientists we have to be more open to publishing in ‘lower scientific impact’ venues but that have a high impact in the real world

BioMed Central highlighting ways in which food crops might be protected against drought caused by climate change

According to Sir John Marsh the future of the countryside depends on economics

Chris Sandbrook asks what is meant by biodiversity in a conservation context

Like Manu Saunders I am a great believer in having others read my papers before submission, their chances of getting through the peer review process relatively unscathed are much improved

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Pick and mix – eclectic links to stuff that caught my interest last week

Hopefully some of these links may be of interest to some of you.

 

Scientists, admittedly probably not all, can appreciate and enjoy poetry, as Stephen Heard points out here

On the Death’s Head Hawkmoth as a honey thief

For those of you who like France, bees and might be considering becoming beekeepers

On the value of native trees and shrubs for wildlife

On a similar vein, here is a paper about the value of native trees for insectivorous birds

More evidence of the importance of biodiversity for ecosystem functioning

The Journal of Biogeography celebrates the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Theory of Island biogeography by posing fifty fundamental questions that might take the discipline further forward

Another one from one of my favourite French sites, this time on the beauties of mosses and lichens

A French farmer asks for help from politicians using an ingenious message board

Over on Dynamic Ecology Jeremy Fox asks if you can think of any successful ecological models based on loose physical analogies?

And finally, announcing the launch of Pantheon, the tool to help you analyse your invertebrate species samples

 

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